troubleshooting

Readily Remembering RAM!

Introduction

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably forgotten your keys a time or two walking out the door. To forget things you’ve learned is natural for us illogical humans, but what about computers? How exactly does a computer remember and what about long term and short term memory? Many people don’t realize that there are actually multiple different types of computer memory and they all play a different role in data storage and retrieval. As a consumer/business owner, it is imperative to know the difference between these two, and when they might need replaced. When it comes to computer memory, there’s no real short answer, so best to view the topic as a whole.

How Does Computer Memory Work?

Computer memory is tricky because it works less like our own memory and more like writing something down. The type of computer memory in this analogy is the material you’re writing on-sand or paper. There is two kinds of memory in a computer: volatile and nonvolatile. Volatile memory is like writing in sand (short term memory); it’s there to be easily and readily accessed by your computer to make things faster, but the information is lost as soon as power is lost, like waves washing it away. Nonvolatile memory (long term memory) is more what people encounter when speaking of memory – it’s like writing on paper, its permanent. So if we have nonvolatile memory that never erases unless deleted, why do we have volatile memory? The purpose of volatile memory on your computer memory is to keep it readily at hand if the information is needed. It contains information like browser cookies, auto-fill, and temporary files. This decreases processing time these items would usually take up, since the computer can access its’ volatile memory to access them instead of having to download them from their original source. No doubt you’ve heard the term “RAM” in reference to computer storage, most people know that the more RAM you have-the faster the computer right? This is partially true, as RAM is the source of the volatile memory that ceases to be when your computer is turned off, so the more information your computer can temporarily hold, the faster it can potentially run. You might notice that if you leave your computer running without shutting down or losing power for extended periods of time it runs slower; this is because your available RAM is lower than it should be, since its’ been accumulating data without shutting down. It should be mentioned, however, that RAM is only half the story when it comes to the speed of your device-you should always be sure to know how much RAM your device can support at maximum.

How Can Computer Memory Affect My Company?

This is a topic many companies seem to brush to the sidelines and in reality, is something you as a business owner will want to pay close attention to. When it comes to your storage (that’s your non-volatile memory) running out of this means pretty effectively ending whatever functions your computers handle. With no space for new information, you will stop receiving email, lose the ability to save files, will be unable to download items from the internet, and you run the risk of having your main servers crash-one of the worst things that can happen to a business computer network. The importance of keeping track of your memory usage cannot be stressed enough in a business environment. It’s also important to keep an eye on RAM and volatile memory, which can cause decreased performance when low, though this is less often a problem. Luckily, there is a simple solution when it comes to remedying low memory: buy more. Memory is sold in all shapes and sizes and typically if, say, your servers are holding about all the information they can and need a memory upgrade, it’s just a matter of installing more RAM into the machine. That being said though, memory can be expensive to purchase in large quantities and many companies will want to avoid this entirely: don’t avoid this entirely. Whereas it can be expensive to upgrade a device’s memory banks, it’s more expensive to lose a server for extended periods of time because it ran out of space to write information.

Conclusion

Memory is an odd subject with computers, due to them storing information much differently than we do. As such, people often become confused when their computer develops a memory issue. Things likes low disk space are common and easily fixed, though there are some more obtuse issues that can crop up with memory, like what to do when a hard disk becomes physically damaged and writing to the disk becomes nearly impossible. As always, when the problems that make you drop your head onto your desk in frustration and dismay reveal themselves to you and your business, Micro Systems Management stands at the ready, with our team of experts to fix the ridiculous, the unthinkable, and the weird problems of the IT world.

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Tuesday, September 13th, 2016 Back to basics, General No Comments

Crank Up the Cold!

Introduction

There’s been a bit of heatwave…well, everywhere recently. This brings up the always interesting topic of heat with relation to your hardware. It’s common knowledge that laptops and PCs can overheat when improperly treated, but servers are possibly even more vulnerable. Servers are typically left continuously running in a confined space and overheating can seriously threaten your data and business continuity. But overheating is a multi-faceted issue, and numerous reasons can be the cause; everything from the temperature of the room, what programs are running, to CPU overclocking.

How Computers Handle Heat

As electricity is carried throughout your device, it inevitably generates heat that can potentially damage your device if not cooled properly. This is typically done with heat sinks and cooling fans inside your device. The cooling fan you’re probably familiar with; it creates the “whirring” sound associated with booting up a computer. The fan has variable speed settings, and will speed up or slow down depending on how much heat needs dissipating; you may notice when you boot up larger programs you can hear the fan speed up in response to this. Heat sinks you may not recognize if you weren’t looking for them; they are small metal fins standing perpendicular to their mount. Heat sinks work by simply providing a conductive surface for heat to transfer to; bigger surface area, means less heat. There are a few other less common cooling systems, even liquid cooled devices exist, though you won’t typically encounter these in an office or home setting.

What Exactly Does Overheating Do?

Overheating can be more of a problem than most people suspect, as it’s typically associated with simple crashing and rebooting. Computers are designed to avoid internal fires and melting points for obvious reasons. Because of this, most modern devices are built with fail-safes that will begin to shut down certain portions of the device if overheating begins-likely culminating in a crash. Best case scenario, you reboot your device and everything is fine; the heating maybe caused by your cat laying too close to the vent blocking it. But overheating can wreak havoc if the conditions are right. Simple physics tells us that when things heat up, they expand. This is very bad for computers; if the computer overheats to this point, it can physically warp your hard-drive making it inoperable.

 

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Shot down in a blaze of glory – and data.

 

Not only this, but small amounts of overheating can slow your device, and even shorten its’ lifespan by up to two years. Most computers are designed to have a maximum internal temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit, if you are consistently running that or above, you may be killing your device without even knowing it. All of this sounds bad, sure, but what does it mean to your business? An overheat of say, your host server, can mean a crash that will keep the system down until the server can be properly cooled and re-booted. This may take ten minutes, or it may take three hours-and time is money.

How Can I Prevent My Device from Overheating?

There’s a few different common causes from overheating that most people (especially those handling important data) should know about. For personal computer or laptops, always make sure the heating vents are unobstructed. If you have vents on the bottom of a laptop, for instance, be sure to rest the device on a hard surface while operating, soft surfaces like your carpet and cotton will insulate the vents and can cause an overheat. Another way to prevent heating issues is to simply clean your device every now and again. Dust built up on the inside of a device acts as an insulator and will lead to higher running temperatures, as well as being able to clog and stop the cooling fan. Another common one is that if you’re using a PC-do not operate the device with an open case! There’s a rumor or two floating about that cracking open the side of your PC casing can give it a better airflow and help it cool-what this actually does is it serves to disrupt the airflow of the device’s cooling fan and it presents your computer internals to external debris and dust which can eventually cause an overheat. Another important aspect to look at it your devices’ location, try to stay away from tight isolated spaces like desk drawers; compact and seemingly convenient as it might sound, the ultimate result is that tight spaces means poor air circulation, and higher running temperatures. A popular trend amongst gamers and people wanting more out of their PC is overclocking. Overclocking is at its’ base form, forcing the CPU to run faster than recommended. This won’t cause instant death; however, should you choose to overlock your CPU be aware of your operating temperature-it will increase. PCs and laptops aren’t the only devices susceptible to overheating, though. Your servers are just as, if not, more vulnerable to heating issues. Location is one of the largest issues to look out for when it comes to server heating; when placing your server, you want to make sure the location is well-ventilated, large enough to allow cool air to circulate, and you want it to be void of open windows. When placing your servers in racks, you also want to make sure they are arranged the same direction, so one server is not blowing hot air into the intake vent of another. Also, one last note for proper server care, make sure your server room’s A/C is set for optimum device cooling and not people cooling-remember computers shouldn’t run above 80 degrees so they have to stay much cooler than we do.

So What Happens if My Device Overheats Anyway?

Give your friendly IT wizards a call.

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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 Back to basics, General No Comments
 

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