Tag Archives: connectivity

Network Connectivity

Computers and other devices can talk to each other, but computers on their own can only handle so much information; if you tried to host all of, say, Google on a single server, it’s simply not possible without a server bigger than your average house. Computers can talk to each other in networks through various means of connection. This connection can be crucial to your operations as a company, or to how fast you can get that cat video to buffer at home. Firstly, for those people unfamiliar with the basic concepts of connectivity and networking; we offer a little primer.

Connectivity basics

Computers are intelligent things, insofar as they can handle a great deal of information, but they’re limited by the amount of information a hard drive can hold. This is where networks come in, the concept to get two (or more) devices to share the information they hold. When these computers are connected, they can share information, but the method of connection itself dictates how fast information can be transferred and how far that information can be transferred. A common type of connection you may have heard of is Ethernet. Ethernet is a type of cable (usually a thick, white or blue cable with a white/clear jack) that runs from the back of most devices into whatever provides your network capabilities (likely a router). An Ethernet cable works very much like a highway; you have one centralized avenue for information to travel (that’s the cable itself) with multiple small “driveways” so information can leave its host device to travel on this “highway” (the “driveways” are the Ethernet ports). Information can then flow more or less freely between devices.  Once that occurs, you have your network. Another common connection for computers is one you most likely experience everyday: Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi, at its’ core, is data transfer via radio waves. Wi-Fi is different than Ethernet insofar as the data transfer is typically slower, but the lack of cables and maintenance means more reliability and ease of use, though it is less secure. Trading ability for convenience, though certain advancements in Wi-Fi have recently allowed for transmission speeds approaching (but not matching) Ethernet cables. Fiber optics are a newer transmission type with incredible transmission speed, though they are very fragile due to their glass cables, and much more expensive than other options. The basics of how they work is: in lieu of radio waves to transmit data, fiber optics use light, allowing incredibly fast transmission speed.

Why does connection matter?

It seems like a silly question, but for many people how they have a connection is irrelevant as long as they have one. Largely, people are satisfied to be connected and don’t think about things like network speed. Sometimes your Wi-Fi signal may be blocked by a wall (older buildings may have block walls or cement ceilings which can result in poor signal), or your Ethernet cable might not be connected on both ends. This all seems trivial until you’re attempting to pull a crucial document off a networked server and it won’t download. Or consider a skype meeting across continents to ensure a deal goes smoothly and the video keeps failing. Most modern companies use computer networking in some way; advertisement via website, grouped workstations, usage of cloud servers; these all require an internet connection, and it can make a real, monetary difference to know the difference between your provider having an issue or a poor signal because someone installed your router behind a brick wall. You should also be careful when accessing public wireless. Typically places like Starbucks will have an unencrypted free public Wi-Fi; you should be careful on these networks and avoid using anything that requires a password: email, banking, and shopping to name a few. These networks are easy prey for people looking to intercept personal information. The internet is not the quiet, gentle place it once was.

What can I do about my connection?

There’s a variety of ways to improve your internet connection on your own without rousing the beast in your office that is the IT department. These methods can be situational though, and vary depending on the problem and type of connection. First, you need to determine that it is in fact a problem with your network connection; what type of computer do you own? Some models come with radio switches that can turn the radio inside of your computer on or off – if it’s off, you’re not going to be connected to the internet anytime soon. Also check to make sure you’re connected to the correct network – Wi-Fi has a limited range so if you’re trying to connect to a network some distance away you might encounter difficulty. On that note you should always know whether you have a wired or wireless internet setup; you can tell this by the connection icon in the lower right of most PCs.

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A few examples of common symbols used to express your devices’ Internet connection

Another question to ask: are you the only one having issues? Ask around, see if anyone else can connect with the Internet – if they can’t, it’s probably not an isolated problem to you. So how do you determine where the problem is when it’s not just you? Go to adjacent office, ask your neighbor if they are having any trouble. If they are (and they use the same service provider) there is likely nothing much you can do, since it’s on the provider’s end. If they’re not having issues, it’s most likely a problem with your network. So what’s the issue exactly now that we’ve determined it’s your network? If everyone is still connected but has a weak or sporadic signal (1-2 bars for Wi-Fi), check your router. It may be that your router is placed far away from the machines it’s connecting, or it may be obstructed.  Radio waves can travel through walls but thick walls like concrete can severely weaken or block them. Resetting your router can often help, but you should never do this without checking with your boss/notifying your employees; the Internet might stay down and that can hurt everyone. Also before handling a router be careful! Some routers are more complex than others and it has the capability to do damage and loss of company productivity if you just start flipping switches. Beyond these basic solutions, it becomes a good idea to contact your IT professional.

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