Tag Archives: back to basics

Overheating

It’s common knowledge that laptops and PCs can overheat when improperly treated, but servers are possibly even more vulnerable. Servers are typically left continuously running in a confined space and overheating can seriously threaten your data and business continuity. But overheating is a multi-faceted issue, and numerous reasons can be the cause; everything from the temperature of the room, what programs are running, to CPU overclocking.

How Computers Handle Heat

As electricity is carried throughout your device, it inevitably generates heat that can potentially damage your device if not cooled properly. This is typically done with heat sinks and cooling fans inside your device. The cooling fan you’re probably familiar with; it creates the “whirring” sound associated with booting up a computer. The fan has variable speed settings, and will speed up or slow down depending on how much heat needs dissipating; you may notice when you boot up larger programs you can hear the fan speed up in response to this. Heat sinks you may not recognize if you weren’t looking for them; they are small metal fins standing perpendicular to their mount. Heat sinks work by simply providing a conductive surface for heat to transfer to; bigger surface area, means less heat. There are a few other less common cooling systems, even liquid cooled devices exist, though you won’t typically encounter these in an office or home setting.

What Exactly Does Overheating Do?

Overheating can be more of a problem than most people suspect, as it’s typically associated with simple crashing and rebooting. Computers are designed to avoid internal fires and melting points for obvious reasons. Because of this, most modern devices are built with fail-safes that will begin to shut down certain portions of the device if overheating begins-likely culminating in a crash. Best case scenario, you reboot your device and everything is fine, provided you’ve removed your device from the heat source if possible. But overheating can wreak havoc if the conditions are right. Simple physics tells us that when things heat up, they expand. This is very bad for computers; if the computer overheats to this point, it can physically warp your hard-drive making it inoperable.

Not only this, but small amounts of overheating can slow your device, and even shorten its’ lifespan by up to two years. Most computers are designed to have a maximum internal temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit, if you are consistently running that or above, you may be killing your device without even knowing it. All of this sounds bad, sure, but what does it mean to your business? An overheat of say, your host server, can mean a crash that will keep the system down until the server can be properly cooled and re-booted. This may take ten minutes, or it may take three hours-and time is money.

How Can I Prevent My Device from Overheating?

There’s a few different common causes from overheating that most people (especially those handling important data) should know about. For personal computer or laptops, always make sure the heating vents are unobstructed. If you have vents on the bottom of a laptop, for instance, be sure to rest the device on a hard surface while operating, soft surfaces like your carpet and cotton will insulate the vents and can cause an overheat. Another way to prevent heating issues is to simply clean your device every now and again. Dust built up on the inside of a device acts as an insulator and will lead to higher running temperatures, as well as being able to clog and stop the cooling fan. Another common one is that if you’re using a PC-do not operate the device with an open case! There’s a rumor or two floating about that cracking open the side of your PC casing can give it a better airflow and help it cool-what this actually does is it serves to disrupt the airflow of the device’s cooling fan and it presents your computer internals to external debris and dust which can eventually cause an overheat, or even damage from outside debris getting into the box. Another important aspect to look at it your devices’ location, try to stay away from tight isolated spaces like desk drawers; compact and seemingly convenient as it might sound, the ultimate result is that tight spaces means poor air circulation, and higher running temperatures. A popular trend amongst gamers and people wanting more out of their PC is overclocking. Overclocking is at its base form, forcing the CPU to run faster than recommended. This won’t cause instant death; however, should you choose to overlock your CPU be aware of your operating temperature-it will increase. PCs and laptops aren’t the only devices susceptible to overheating, though. Your servers are just as, if not, more vulnerable to heating issues. Location is one of the largest issues to look out for when it comes to server heating; when placing your server, you want to make sure the location is well-ventilated, large enough to allow cool air to circulate, and you want it to be void of open windows. When placing your servers in racks, you also want to make sure they are arranged the same direction, so one server is not blowing hot air into the intake vent of another. Also, one last note for proper server care, make sure your server room’s A/C is set for optimum device cooling and not people cooling-remember computers shouldn’t run above 80 degrees so they have to stay much cooler than we do.

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Little-known ways to get more out of Outlook

Microsoft Outlook is a little bit like cooking: everyone knows at least a little about it, and many people depend on it in their day-to-day lives. Most Outlook users only touch the tip of the iceberg when it comes to all the different things Outlook can do. So, without further ado, here are a few effort-saving Outlook tricks to have up your sleeve. (Note: these tips were written with Outlook 2013 in mind. Certain functions may be different in older Outlook versions.)

Keep track of your billable hours, phone calls, tasks, meetings, etc. with the Journal tool.

It’s hard to believe so few people know about or use this tool, since it’s so versatile. It even has a built-in timer so that you’ll accurately know exactly how long that meeting took. (Your billing department is going to LOVE you.) To find it, select the Folders option on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen. In the navigation pane to the left of your inbox, select Journal. You can add a new entry by clicking on Journal Entry under the Home tab, and a dropdown box allows you to choose categories for phone calls, faxes, meetings, tasks, and others. You can add notes to yourself, details, you can color-code your entries, view them different ways…you get the idea. The Timer option (under the Journal Entry tab) will let you start or stop timekeeping for a task.

Create email templates and reusable text blocks without copy-and-pasting.

To create an email template: This is a good option if you need “form letters” of any kind. Write out the “master” version of the email (you don’t have to send it) and then, under the blue File tab, click Save As. In the Save as type bar, below the File name bar, click the dropdown arrow and select Outlook Template. Give it a descriptive title (e.g. “Sales Form Letter”) and save it. When you want to create a new message using the template, either double-click on the file you saved itself, or, under the Home tab, go to New Items > More Items > Choose Form…. Click the dropdown arrow for the Look In bar and select User Templates in File System. Your template should show up there.

To create reusable text blocks: This can save you time if you frequently use the same paragraphs, images, or links in your emails. Type the text you want to reuse into a new email message and highlight it with your cursor. Then, from the Insert tab, click Quick Parts and then Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. Give the block a name (e.g. “Greeting,” “Disclaimer”). The next time you want to include the text block in your email, select the Quick Part you created from the Insert > Quick Parts menu.

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Malvertising

Maybe you do everything right: you only go to websites you trust, you have updated antivirus and anti-malware programs, you use complex passwords, but you still deal with the occasional Internet annoyance, like pop-up or banner ads. Unavoidable and pesky, but part of the web-surfing territory, right? They’re annoying, but they don’t really get in your way. Why should you worry about them?

Even if you never click on them – I REPEAT – even if you don’t interact with them at all, they can infect your computer with malware – just by being displayed on your screen.

Here’s the problem.

You see, most websites innocently use ad services to create revenue – even websites you trust, like your favorite news site. The ad service will set up a certain number of ads in a rotation on the website. While many of the ads are harmless, sometimes an ad in the rotation will have invisible, malicious code embedded in it (without either the ad service or the website knowing about it). When your computer displays the ad, the evil, embedded code gets run on your computer, looks for any security “holes” it knows how to exploit, and downloads the right kind of malware for your particular vulnerability.

You won’t even know what hit you until, say, you find that your browser homepage has changed to a porn site or ransom page. And you were just trying to update your fantasy football league stats! Thankfully, there are some simple steps you can take which will greatly reduce your chances of falling prey to this type of attack.

Step 1: Update your web browser(s).

You’re probably reading this right now using an internet browser like Internet Explorer (or the new Microsoft Edge), Firefox, Safari, or Chrome. If you don’t know if you have the most current version of your browser, here are some directions for finding out. (It never hurts to double check!)

Step 2: Update your web browser plugins.

Javascript and Flash are the two biggest security concerns. Click here to check your version of Java and here to update Flash. You can also change your browser’s default plugin settings so your computer must “ask to activate” them. Disable unnecessary plugins entirely.

Step 3: Download good web browser protection programs.

If you’re using Firefox, Adblock Plus and NoScript are great browser extensions that will prevent most ads from displaying and will prevent a lot of “invisible” browser activity from happening. Malwarebytes also offers a good free version of its Anti-Exploit Kit (for personal use) that specifically defends against malvertising attacks.

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