Crank Up the Cold!

Introduction

There’s been a bit of heatwave…well, everywhere recently. This brings up the always interesting topic of heat with relation to your hardware. It’s common knowledge that laptops and PCs can overheat when improperly treated, but servers are possibly even more vulnerable. Servers are typically left continuously running in a confined space and overheating can seriously threaten your data and business continuity. But overheating is a multi-faceted issue, and numerous reasons can be the cause; everything from the temperature of the room, what programs are running, to CPU overclocking.

How Computers Handle Heat

As electricity is carried throughout your device, it inevitably generates heat that can potentially damage your device if not cooled properly. This is typically done with heat sinks and cooling fans inside your device. The cooling fan you’re probably familiar with; it creates the “whirring” sound associated with booting up a computer. The fan has variable speed settings, and will speed up or slow down depending on how much heat needs dissipating; you may notice when you boot up larger programs you can hear the fan speed up in response to this. Heat sinks you may not recognize if you weren’t looking for them; they are small metal fins standing perpendicular to their mount. Heat sinks work by simply providing a conductive surface for heat to transfer to; bigger surface area, means less heat. There are a few other less common cooling systems, even liquid cooled devices exist, though you won’t typically encounter these in an office or home setting.

What Exactly Does Overheating Do?

Overheating can be more of a problem than most people suspect, as it’s typically associated with simple crashing and rebooting. Computers are designed to avoid internal fires and melting points for obvious reasons. Because of this, most modern devices are built with fail-safes that will begin to shut down certain portions of the device if overheating begins-likely culminating in a crash. Best case scenario, you reboot your device and everything is fine; the heating maybe caused by your cat laying too close to the vent blocking it. But overheating can wreak havoc if the conditions are right. Simple physics tells us that when things heat up, they expand. This is very bad for computers; if the computer overheats to this point, it can physically warp your hard-drive making it inoperable.

 

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Shot down in a blaze of glory – and data.

 

Not only this, but small amounts of overheating can slow your device, and even shorten its’ lifespan by up to two years. Most computers are designed to have a maximum internal temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit, if you are consistently running that or above, you may be killing your device without even knowing it. All of this sounds bad, sure, but what does it mean to your business? An overheat of say, your host server, can mean a crash that will keep the system down until the server can be properly cooled and re-booted. This may take ten minutes, or it may take three hours-and time is money.

How Can I Prevent My Device from Overheating?

There’s a few different common causes from overheating that most people (especially those handling important data) should know about. For personal computer or laptops, always make sure the heating vents are unobstructed. If you have vents on the bottom of a laptop, for instance, be sure to rest the device on a hard surface while operating, soft surfaces like your carpet and cotton will insulate the vents and can cause an overheat. Another way to prevent heating issues is to simply clean your device every now and again. Dust built up on the inside of a device acts as an insulator and will lead to higher running temperatures, as well as being able to clog and stop the cooling fan. Another common one is that if you’re using a PC-do not operate the device with an open case! There’s a rumor or two floating about that cracking open the side of your PC casing can give it a better airflow and help it cool-what this actually does is it serves to disrupt the airflow of the device’s cooling fan and it presents your computer internals to external debris and dust which can eventually cause an overheat. Another important aspect to look at it your devices’ location, try to stay away from tight isolated spaces like desk drawers; compact and seemingly convenient as it might sound, the ultimate result is that tight spaces means poor air circulation, and higher running temperatures. A popular trend amongst gamers and people wanting more out of their PC is overclocking. Overclocking is at its’ base form, forcing the CPU to run faster than recommended. This won’t cause instant death; however, should you choose to overlock your CPU be aware of your operating temperature-it will increase. PCs and laptops aren’t the only devices susceptible to overheating, though. Your servers are just as, if not, more vulnerable to heating issues. Location is one of the largest issues to look out for when it comes to server heating; when placing your server, you want to make sure the location is well-ventilated, large enough to allow cool air to circulate, and you want it to be void of open windows. When placing your servers in racks, you also want to make sure they are arranged the same direction, so one server is not blowing hot air into the intake vent of another. Also, one last note for proper server care, make sure your server room’s A/C is set for optimum device cooling and not people cooling-remember computers shouldn’t run above 80 degrees so they have to stay much cooler than we do.

So What Happens if My Device Overheats Anyway?

Give your friendly IT wizards a call.

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Thursday, August 4th, 2016 Back to basics, General No Comments

My Internet Died Again!

Introduction

Computers and other devices can talk to each other, but computers on their own can only handle so much information; if you tried to host all of, say, Google on a single server, it’s simply not possible without a server bigger than your average house. Computers can talk to each other in networks through various means of connection. This connection can be crucial to your operations as a company, or to how fast you can get that cat video to buffer at home. Firstly, for those people unfamiliar with the basic concepts of connectivity and networking; we offer a little primer (you veterans may skip ahead a section if you’d like).

Connectivity basics

Computers are intelligent things, insofar as they can handle a great deal of information, but they’re limited by the amount of information a hard drive can hold. This is where networks come in, the concept to get two (or more) devices to share the information they hold. When these computers are connected, they can share information, but the method of connection itself dictates how fast information can be transferred and how far that information can be transferred. A common type of connection you may have heard of is Ethernet. Ethernet is a type of cable (usually a thick, white or blue cable with a white/clear jack) that runs from the back of most devices into whatever provides your network capabilities (likely a router). An Ethernet cable works very much like a highway; you have one centralized avenue for information to travel (that’s the cable itself) with multiple small “driveways” so information can leave its host device to travel on this “highway” (the “driveways” are the Ethernet ports). Information can then flow more or less freely between devices.  Once that occurs, you have your network. Another common connection for computers is one you most likely experience everyday: Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi is not the magical internet particle that the gods of the web have bestowed upon the common folk, despite how people think (or don’t think) of it. Wi-Fi, at its’ core, is data transfer via radio waves. Wi-Fi is different than Ethernet insofar as the data transfer is typically slower, but the lack of cables and maintenance means more reliability and ease of use, though it is less secure. Trading ability for convenience, though certain advancements in Wi-Fi have recently allowed for transmission speeds approaching (but not matching) Ethernet cables. Fiber optics are a newer transmission type with incredible transmission speed, though they are very fragile due to their glass cables, and much more expensive than other options. The basics of how they work is: in lieu of radio waves to transmit data, fiber optics use light, allowing incredibly fast transmission speed.

Why does connection matter?

It seems like a silly question, but for many people how they have a connection is irrelevant as long as they have one. Largely, people are satisfied to be connected and don’t think about things like network speed; if something is accessing slowly, it must be an issue with my provider/computer! This is not always the case, though. Sometimes your Wi-Fi signal may be blocked by a wall (older buildings may have block walls or cement ceilings which can result in poor signal), or your Ethernet cable might not be connected on both ends. This all seems trivial until you’re attempting to pull a crucial document off a networked server and it won’t download. Or consider a skype meeting across continents to ensure a deal goes smoothly and the video keeps failing. Most modern companies use computer networking in some way; advertisement via website, grouped workstations, usage of cloud servers; these all require an internet connection, and it can make a real, monetary difference to know the difference between your provider having an issue or a poor signal because someone installed your router behind a brick wall. You should also be careful when accessing public wireless. Typically places like Starbucks will have an unencrypted free public Wi-Fi; you should be careful on these networks and avoid using anything that requires a password: email, banking, and shopping to name a few. These networks are easy prey for people looking to intercept personal information. The internet is not the quiet, gentle place it once was.

What can I do about my connection?

There’s a variety of ways to improve your internet connection on your own without rousing the beast in your office that is the IT department. These methods can be situational though, and vary depending on the problem and type of connection. First, you need to determine that it is in fact a problem with your network connection; what type of computer do you own? Some models come with radio switches that can turn the radio inside of your computer on or off – if it’s off, you’re not going to be connected to the internet anytime soon. Also check to make sure you’re connected to the correct network – Wi-Fi has a limited range so if you’re trying to connect to a network some distance away you might encounter difficulty. On that note you should always know whether you have a wired or wireless internet setup; you can tell this by the connection icon in the lower right of most PCs.

 

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A few examples of common symbols used to express your devices’ internet connection

 

Another question to ask: are you the only one having issues? Ask around, see if anyone else can connect with the internet – if they can’t, it’s probably not an isolated problem to you. So how do you determine where the problem is when it’s not just you? Go to adjacent office, ask your neighbor if they are having any trouble. If they are (and they use the same service provider) there is likely nothing much you can do, since it’s on the provider’s end. If they’re not having issues, it’s most likely a problem with your network. So what’s the issue exactly now that we’ve determined it’s your network? If everyone is still connected but has a weak or sporadic signal (1-2 bars for Wi-Fi), check your router. It may be that your router is placed far away from the machines it’s connecting, or it may be obstructed.  Radio waves can travel through walls but thick walls like concrete can severely weaken or block them. Resetting your router can often help, but you should never do this without checking with your boss/notifying your employees; the internet might stay down and that can hurt everyone. Also before handling a router be careful! Some routers are more complex than others and it has the capability to do damage and loss of company productivity if you just start flipping switches. Beyond these basic solutions, it becomes a good idea to contact your IT professional (we happen to know just the right people) and remember to ask nicely, computer wizardry isn’t easy, you know.

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Thursday, July 7th, 2016 Back to basics, General, Internet No Comments

IRS Disables e-File PIN After Recent Suspicious Activity Found

As of June 24, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has disabled the e-File PIN as suspicious activity was recently detected.1, 2

This is not the first time in recent months that the IRS has disabled the e-File PIN as the result of suspicious activity.3 As of January 2016, the IRS detected an automated attack against its e-File PIN application.4

The January 2016, e-File PIN attack involved hackers collecting personal information from other sources and then using the Social Security Numbers of those people to generate e-File PINs.5 According to the IRS, approximately 464,000 Social Security Numbers were involved and the hackers successfully generated e-File PINs for 101,000 Social Security Numbers.6

The IRS had already been considering scrapping the e-File PIN application at some time in 2016, but the integration of a number of commercial tax applications with e-File PIN led to the IRS choosing not to do away with it after the first reported attack against the application earlier this year.7

How Can You Protect Yourself?

One of the key findings in the IRS alert released on June 24, 2016, is that in the January 2016, attack, the criminals used information they obtained from other sources to attack the e-File PIN.8 Information that the hackers used included:

  • Names9
  • Addresses10
  • Filing Status11
  • Dates of Birth12
  • Social Security Numbers13

Ask yourself how many of the above things can be found about you online. Think about the information you share on websites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. If the above information is available on any of your online accounts then you are making it easier for hackers to use your information in attacks. Remember, hackers can obtain this information from other sources too. One non-cyber way hackers can collect information to use in a follow-on cyber attack is impersonating the IRS during phone calls.14 Of course hackers can attempt to collect information about you through a variety of media including phone calls, text messages, emails, and faxes.15

Here are some extra tips on how to keep yourself safe.

  1. Limit the amount of information you provide to websites.
  2. When you provide personal information to websites make sure you are on an encrypted connection.
  3. Do not do any sensitive work (filing your taxes, accessing your bank account, or paying for things online) on the same computer you do heavy web browsing.
  4. Regularly update your anti-virus.
  5. Regularly run full anti-virus scans of all of your systems (computers and phones).
  6. When a virus is found on your computer, immediately take appropriate security steps to secure all accounts that have been accessed from that computer and verify that the infection is properly removed from your computer.
  7. Keep the operating system on your computer completely updated.
  8. Keep programs on your computer like Java and Flash completely updated.
  9. Enable the firewall on your computer and make sure it is configured to block unauthorized inbound traffic.
  10. Never reply to unsolicited emails requesting sensitive information. If you receive an email requesting information contact the sender by phone or in person to confirm they sent the email and if they need the information they asked for arrange to provide the information in person or using encryption.

If you believe you are a victim of an IRS scam or are suspicious about a phone call, text message, email, fax, or letter in the mail requesting information claiming it is from the IRS report the incident with the IRS following the directions on their website.

If you have questions, are interested in scheduling security training, or have a virus on your computer you want assistance with, please contact us to setup a meeting.

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Thursday, June 30th, 2016 Cybersecurity No Comments

Little-known ways to get more out of Outlook

Microsoft Outlook is a little bit like cooking: everyone knows at least a little about it, and many people depend on it in their day-to-day lives. But as everyone who’s ever tasted Aunt Matilda’s Holiday Jello Surprise knows, not all cooks are created equal. (No offense to any actual Aunt Matildas out there; I’m sure your cooking is delightful.)

“No, really, Aunt Matilda, it…uh…it just looks too pretty to eat.”

 

Point being, most Outlook users only touch the tip of the iceberg when it comes to all the different things Outlook can do. So, without further ado, here are a few effort-saving Outlook tricks to have up your sleeve. (Note: these tips were written with Outlook 2013 in mind. Certain functions may be different in older Outlook versions.)

Keep track of your billable hours, phone calls, tasks, meetings, etc. with the Journal tool.
It’s hard to believe so few people know about or use this tool, since it’s so versatile. It even has a built-in timer so that you’ll accurately know exactly how long that meeting took. (Your billing department is going to LOVE you.) To find it, select the Folders option on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen. In the navigation pane to the left of your inbox, select Journal. You can add a new entry by clicking on Journal Entry under the Home tab, and a dropdown box allows you to choose categories for phone calls, faxes, meetings, tasks, and others. You can add notes to yourself, details, you can color-code your entries, view them different ways…you get the idea. The Timer option (under the Journal Entry tab) will let you start or stop timekeeping for a task.

Create email templates and reusable text blocks without copy-and-pasting.
To create an email template: This is a good option if you need “form letters” of any kind. Write out the “master” version of the email (you don’t have to send it) and then, under the blue File tab, click Save As. In the Save as type bar, below the File name bar, click the dropdown arrow and select Outlook Template. Give it a descriptive title (e.g. “Sales Form Letter”) and save it. When you want to create a new message using the template, either double-click on the file you saved itself, or, under the Home tab, go to New Items > More Items > Choose Form…. Click the dropdown arrow for the Look In bar and select User Templates in File System. Your template should show up there.

To create reusable text blocks: This can save you time if you frequently use the same paragraphs, images, or links in your emails. Type the text you want to reuse into a new email message and highlight it with your cursor. Then, from the Insert tab, click Quick Parts and then Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. Give the block a name (e.g. “Greeting,” “Disclaimer”). The next time you want to include the text block in your email, select the Quick Part you created from the Insert > Quick Parts menu.

Loved this? Hated it? Want to know more? Let us know! Email us at marketing (at) msmctech (dot) com.

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Wednesday, November 11th, 2015 Back to basics, General No Comments

Malvertising: Ads that are bad!

Maybe you do everything right: you only go to websites you trust, you have updated antivirus and anti-malware programs, you use complex passwords, you even floss twice daily. (Just kidding. Nobody does that.) But you still deal with the occasional internet annoyance, like pop-up or banner ads. Unavoidable and pesky, but part of the web-surfing territory, right? They’re annoying, but they don’t really get in your way. Why should you worry about them?

Well, because they can be sneaky as all-get-out, that’s why. And even if you never click on them – I REPEAT – even if you don’t interact with them at all, they can infect your computer with malware – just by being displayed on your screen.

Here’s the problem.

You see, most websites innocently use ad services to create revenue – even websites you trust, like your favorite news site. The ad service will set up a certain number of ads in a rotation on the website. While many of the ads are harmless, sometimes an ad in the rotation will have invisible, malicious code embedded in it (without either the ad service or the website knowing about it). When your computer displays the ad, the evil, embedded code gets run on your computer, looks for any security “holes” it knows how to exploit, and downloads the right kind of malware for your particular vulnerability.

You won’t even know what hit you until, say, you find that your browser homepage has changed to a porn site or ransom page. And you were just trying to update your fantasy football league stats! Thankfully, there are some simple steps you can take which will greatly reduce your chances of falling prey to this type of attack.

Step 1: Update your internet browser.

You’re probably reading this right now using an internet browser like Internet Explorer (or the new Microsoft Edge), Firefox, Safari, or Chrome. If you don’t know if you have the most current version of your browser, here are some directions for finding out. (It never hurts to double check!)

Step 2: Update your browser plugins.

Javascript and Flash are the two biggest security concerns. Click here to check your version of Java and here to update Flash. You can also change your browser’s default plugin settings so your computer must “ask to activate” them. Disable unnecessary plugins entirely.

Step 3: Download good browser protection programs.

If you’re using Firefox, Adblock Plus and NoScript are great browser extensions that will prevent most ads from displaying and will prevent a lot of “invisible” browser activity from happening. Malwarebytes also offers a good free version of its Anti-Exploit Kit (for personal use) that specifically defends against malvertising attacks.

Step 4: As always, take care when browsing. Click wisely!

We’re always happy to help if you have questions or concerns about internet/computer security, or if you’d just like to learn more. Feel free to email us at marketing (at) msmctech (dot) com.

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Friday, September 25th, 2015 Cybersecurity, General, Internet No Comments

As an attorney, how would you defend yourself?

USA Today reports in the November 12th 2014 issue that “Former Jodi Arias attorneys blamed for porn deletion”. The claim is that when the defense attorneys viewed the evidence at the police station, that they secretly deleted thousands of files. This is why it is important, if not imperative, that attorneys never work with live evidence. Had the attorney been working from a forensically sound copy, as they should have been, this allegation could not have been made.

The sad part is that most attorneys have not had the training to know how to use a forensic copy. That is not hard to fix, as this process simply isn’t that hard.

1. The police should *never* give access to original evidence that could be altered – in the case of hard drives, or mobile devices, forensic copies should be made for examination.

2. An attorney should *insist* that the evidence that they are examining must be in such a condition that it could not be altered. Failure to do this invites this kind of claim.

3. An attorney should request an authenticated copy of all electronic evidence. These authenticated copies can easily be compared to the original to verify that the data is authentic

4. An attorney should possess software that can mount the forensic copy as a drive on their computer. (This software is FREE.)

5. The attorney should know where to look for standard documents.

What are the take-aways?

• If the police department, or opposing counsel, lets you have access to evidence that can be altered, REJECT IT.

• If the police department, or opposing counsel, gives you access to evidence that has not been authenticated, REJECT IT.

• If you get an authenticated image of electronic evidence, know how to mount it.

• Once you mount the authenticated image of electronic evidence, know where to look for common files.

• When in doubt, consult a certified forensic computer examiner.

I’ve heard attorneys state “relax, this isn’t life or death”. In this instance, and the instance of Casey Anthony, I have to differ in opinion.

Jodi Arias was found guilty of murder, and the evidence was overwhelming. If this improper handling of evidence is used as grounds for a new trial, then a murderer could go free.

If the investigators that were working the Casey Anthony case had done a proper investigation of the internet browsers on Casey’s computer, perhaps there would be some degree of justice for her daughter, Caylee. I am not casting blame on anyone – the fact is that people make mistakes. However, if those mistakes can be fixed, then there is no excuse to make them again.

This evidence, found on June 16th, 2008 (the day Caylee Anthony died), was never admitted as evidence.

•At 2:49 p.m., after George Anthony said he had left for work and while Casey Anthony’s cellphone is pinging a tower nearest the home, the Anthony family’s desktop computer is activated by someone using a password-protected account Casey Anthony used;

•At 2:51 p.m., on a browser primarily Casey Anthony used, a Google search for the term “fool-proof suffocation,” misspelling the last word as “suffication”;

•Five seconds later, the user clicks on an article that criticizes pro-suicide websites that include advice on “foolproof” ways to die. “Poison yourself and then follow it up with suffocation” by placing “a plastic bag over the head,” the writer quotes others as advising;

•At 2:52 p.m., the browser records activity on MySpace, a website Casey Anthony used frequently and George Anthony did not.

Does this mean the Casey was guilty? That is not for me to say. What it does mean, is that valuable evidence was not considered because someone didn’t know what they were doing. We all do our jobs to make a living, but there must be something greater than that. We have an obligation to society to help fix the things that are wrong.

The things I point out in this article, we can help you fix.

 

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Thursday, November 13th, 2014 Forensics, Internet, Legal No Comments

Is being AWARE enough?

ncsam

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month.  Now you are aware.

The question, however, that remains is “what does that mean to me?”  I’m glad you asked.  In 2014 companies such as Chase, Target, KMart, Home Depot, Neiman Marcus, and yes, even the hallowed Dairy Queen were all breached.  It is safe to say that warfare has evolved –  That is not to say that spears no longer work, however the reach of a computer with an internet connection is much greater than anything we could have ever imagined.

But again, “what does that mean to me?”. With any weapon, comes responsibility – we are not going to teach you how to make your computer a threat – far from it – we want to show you how to be a little safer FROM those threats. The truth is, it is all the same things you have heard before – but let’s take a look at WHY these steps are important.

KEEP YOUR COMPUTER CURRENT
Most of the time, exploits are targeted at “weak” systems.  By keeping your operating system current, you are taking advantage of the diligence of the creator of those operating systems to make your computer safe.  There are always stories of “that update killed my computer” … and a lot of them are true.  Our advice is to update your computer on the first day of the month.  Almost nobody releases their updates during the last week of a month – this will give time for the bugs to be worked out.

USE A GOOD ANTI-VIRUS PRODUCT
Would you get a flu shot from your convenient store? How about an anti-biotic from a guy on Craigs List?  No?  Then don’t get a third-world free anti-virus product.  This is your first line of defense.  Consider it the cost of doing business.

BE CAREFUL WHERE YOU GO
Just like you wouldn’t walk down dark alleys with twenty dollar bills hanging out of your pockets yelling “I’m unarmed and wealthy ..”, don’t hang out in places that are prone to be frequented by hackers.  If you are given to adult sites and gambling, consider getting a throw-away computer for that activity.

DON’T LET YOURSELF BE USED
You wouldn’t let your computer be used by a stranger would you?  (please say “no”)  There are some programs in the wild called a RAT.  RAT means Remote Access Trojan; it is a program designed to let a stranger use your computer to perform whatever act that they would like.  RATS are considered malware and are the preferred weapon of ne’er-do-wells who would seek to do your harm.  It is important that you understand that a RAT is not a virus, and as a result MAY NOT BE DETECTED by your anti-virus.  Please make certain that you have an anti-malware product installed, or that your anti-virus software contains an anti-malware component.

WHEW!
So, now your protection is current, you are only going to pure and holy websites, and you refuse to participate in bad things.  Now what ?
The word of the day is INFORMED.  Remain informed from your trusted advisors as to new and unusual threats and how to deal with them.  We know that the tool at your hand can be your best friend – we just want to make certain that it isn’t your enemy’s best friend too. As always, consult with your local technical consultant.  If you don’t have one, or if you don’t like the one you DO have, please let us know.  We are always happy to discuss the well-being of our clients and friends.

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Monday, October 13th, 2014 Cybersecurity, General 1 Comment

Get off of my cloud!

Isn’t it amazing how our government, politicians and large companies push us into THEIR decisions for our future?  Wait a minute – did she say “large companies”?!  Yes, I did.  Technology is experiencing that very phenomenon through cloud computing.  By giving consumers and companies substantial savings, we can now use the cloud for almost everything technology.  Look, I get it, no one likes to spend $500 on a piece of software to own it outright when, for $15/month, one can use the cloud version.  It’s all about ROI (return on investment).  It would take, under this scenario, just under 3 years to make purchasing the software profitable, and by then, the current version will be obsolete.  Is there an inherent danger in having your company’s technology, processes or both, all in the cloud?  We all have heard about the infiltrations, hackers, malware, ransomware and viruses.  But here’s one to ponder which might not have received thought:

Has your internet ever gone down?  During business hours?
It’s frustrating when it happens, isn’t it?

What if all of your company’s technology functions were in the cloud (i.e. Internet)?  It would most likely bring your entire company to a grinding halt. Imagine ALL of your personnel sitting there (on your payroll) unable to work until the internet comes back up.  How long do you wait before you send them home for the day?  How much new and existing business would it cost you?

OK – what’s the solution?  “I can’t afford to keep buying my hardware and software when cloud solutions will save me so much money!”

The best answer is one of moderation.  We do believe that there are some instances where the “cloud” is the absolute best choice.  But it isn’t the ONLY  choice – and there are a myriad of options.  In this industry, there are a lot of people making a lot of money converting your world to their cloud.  But we would be remiss if we didn’t tell you about companies that put the needs of their business ahead of yours.  Like the difference between buying and leasing, there are factors to be considered; who really owns the data that you think is yours?  You may be unpleasantly surprised at the answer.

There is no single solution that fits everyone.  We encourage you to schedule a meeting with one of our cloud experts to discuss the possibilities.

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Thursday, June 26th, 2014 General, Internet 1 Comment

Microsoft Releases Patch for IE vulnerability

Well, if you read my post from yesterday, I gave you a work-around to avoid the problems caused by the Internet Explorer Vulnerability when using Adobe Flash.

Today, in an unprecedented move, Microsoft not only released a patch for all versions of IE, they also issued a patch for Windows XP.  It is well-known that they said that there would be no more, however Microsoft contends that since this vulnerability existing long before the deadline for Windows XP, that an exception was in order.  I applaud them for that decision.

The security bulletin that announces the patch can be found here .

Otherwise, if you have Automatic Updates turned on, it will push for you.

SO – Remember – if you did perform the workaround, you should UNDO it after you apply the patch.

You can then return to watching flash-based content in Internet Explorer.

EVEN if you primarily use FireFox, or another browser, Internet Explorer may still be on your computer, and we DO recommend that you update it.

As always, please feel free to call us with any questions.

 

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Friday, May 2nd, 2014 General No Comments

Internet Explorer Vulnerability?

I’m sure you have probably heard on the news, or been sent an email describing the terrors of the Internet Explorer vulnerability.  It is concerning when so many IT companies want to use scare tactics to get in the door of your company.  Yes, there is a concern – yes it is real.  But does it apply to you ?

Do you use FireFox, or Chrome, or Safari, or Opera ?  Then this doesn’t apply to you.  There are other issues which may be present with your chosen browser, but this one isn’t yours. You may safely stop reading and enjoy the rest of your day. However, some people *must* use Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as it is required by their software or their workplace.  What can you do ?

First of all you must know the conditions that must be met for this vulnerability to apply to you:

1) You must be using Internet Explorer
2) You must be viewing an animation that requires Adobe Flash

Not doing that ?  Then you need not worry.

You ARE doing that ?  Well, then we need to do something until Microsoft releases its patch to remedy the vulnerability.
The easiest thing to do is simply disable flash until it is fixed.  Now, you *can* install FireFox, Chrome, or another browser if you like, but you should be aware that they may not work with your software.

This isn’t difficult to do.

6 steps (not kidding) – if you have dual monitors, put these instructions up on one screen and do the steps on the other:

  • While in Internet Explorer
  • Click on Tools Menu item or Gear in the upper right hand corner of your screen
  • Choose Manage Add-Ons
  • Locate Shockwave Flash Object (Under Adobe Systems)
  • Highlight it
  • Click “Disable” in the lower right hand corner

How does this affect me while I wait for Microsoft to release the patch for this vulnerability:  You will not be able to view any animations which require Adobe Flash.  An example would be YouTube animations.

We fully expect Microsoft to release a solution by early next week.

If you have any questions or concerns, please call us at:  440.892.9997.

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Thursday, May 1st, 2014 Cybersecurity, General, Internet No Comments
 

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